Friday, 14 October 2016

Sooji Halwa - Semolina Halwa.

Assalamu alaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuhu!

In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful

The kind that we eat with pooris and chanay!
This Sooji Halwa is a classic Pakistani dessert but as with the others I've made in the past, it was always shrouded in mystery.

I didn't even know what the halwa was made of until now. Now, I know it's made with semolina which is a type of wheat. The semolina doesn't look like much but once it's roasted in melted butter and then sweetened with a cardamom sugar syrup, it is good. The stuff of Pakistani dreams.
The six-ingredient recipe itself is actually quite simple. Don't rush it especially the part where we cook the semolina out in melted butter. We'll want the semolina to get darker in colour and give off the most delicious roasted, nutty scent. It made our kitchen smell amazing!


I love this halwa hot but it is just as good cold. My grandmother used to serve it with pooris but we like to make it a full meal and add chanay. However your family eats it, this halwa is just as good served simply with hot cardamom tea. Just what we need to ward off the autumnal chill.

Halwa, previously: carrot halwa

A Simple List of Ingredients:
1. Water
2. Caster Sugar
3. Cardamoms
4. Butter
5. Fine Semolina
6. Raisins (optional)

Bismillah, let's begin!

Let's start by making a cardamom sugar syrup.

Into a deep saucepan, place 1 litre + 30ml Water.

Next, the sugar that will sweeten our halwa. I added an equal amount of both sugar and semolina. If you like things sweeter, add double the amount of sugar to semolina or 1 and 1/2 times sugar to 1 part semolina.

I added in 180g Caster Sugar.

Next, add in 7 Cardamoms, broken in half.

Stir everything together.


Bring the syrup to a boil. Then, simmer until the liquid is clear and the sugar has dissolved.


At this point, I removed the cardamoms but you may keep them in.


Keep the syrup over a low heat so that it can stay warm until needed.

Next, to make the actual halwa. Take a deep pan and place over a medium heat.


We start with butter. You may also use ghee, if you prefer.


Add in 140g Butter.


Let the butter melt.


Next, the main ingredient, fine semolina which is also known as sooji.

To the melted butter, add in 180g Fine Semolina.


Once in ...


... stir it in.


Once it's all stirred in, it's time for the most crucial part of the halwa.


We're going to cook and stir the halwa until it has changed its colour to a caramel brown.


We will do this by cooking it over a medium-low heat until it begins to also release its oil.


We're also looking to see a change in the smell. Once properly roasted and cooked, it should smell quite nutty and fragrant.


This may take around 5-10 minutes or even a little longer.


Be patient and do not rush or walk away from the pan as the halwa can easily burn.


Once the halwa reaches this stage, it's time to add in the sugar syrup. Place the heat on the lowest and begin to slowly ladle in the syrup into the halwa.


Be careful as it will splutter and hiss.


As the syrup is added in, start to stir in the syrup.


Whilst the syrup is being stirred in, you can add in any extras you want.


We went with raisins but you could add any other dried fruit or nuts you like.


I added in 80g Raisins.


Stir in them in.


Then, cook, stirring over a medium heat until the halwa begins to pull away from the sides of the pan.


And with that, the halwa is done!


Sprinkle over nuts and serve!

I like to serve the halwa hot but it is just as good cold. Once cold, it will solidify slightly and you can cut it up into different shapes, if you wish.


The halwa is delicious on its own but equally as good with chanay and pooris.

Full Written Recipe:


Sooji Halwa – Semolina Halwa.

Cook Time: About 30-40 minutes.
Serves: About 8 people.

Ingredients

For the Cardamom Sugar Syrup
1 litre + 30ml Water
180g Caster Sugar (or to taste)
7 Cardamoms, broken in half

For the Semolina Halwa
140g Butter
180g Fine Semolina (Sooji)
80g Raisins (optional)

Method

First, make the cardamom sugar syrup. Place the water, caster sugar and cardamoms in a deep pan. Bring to the boil and then simmer until the liquid is clear and the sugar has dissolved. Keep on a low heat so that it stays warm until needed. You may remove the cardamoms, if you prefer.

Next, make the halwa. Take a large, deep pan and place over a medium heat. Add in the butter and let it melt completely.

Then, add in the semolina. Stir it in and cook over a medium-low heat until it begins to release its oil, the colour changes to a caramel brown and you can smell its roasting aroma. This may take around 5-10 minutes or a little longer. Be patient and do not rush or walk away from the pan.

Next, over a low heat, ladle the sugar syrup into the semolina pan. Be careful as it will splutter and hiss. Stir it all in and then cook, stirring over a medium heat until it begins to pull away from the sides of the pan. Add in the raisins, at this point too.


Serve hot or cold. The halwa will solidify slightly as it cools so you can also cut it into squares or any shape you like. Enjoy!

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Keep me in your duas please, and enjoy your halwa,

Assalamu alaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuhu!

4 comments

  1. Waalaikumussalam warahmatullah... I have always been crazy about the halwa that comes with puri, but since we normally don't have sweet with poori, I order and eat by myself... :) Just love the color of the halwa... only amount of butter scares me...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sure the halwa will be a treat for you! Enjoy!

      Delete
  2. I love this halwa, it was one of the first sweets I made when I first started cooking. I definitely have to rekindle my love for this halwa by trying your recipe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For me, it was a childhood favourite and its cooking method was always a mystery. But it's so easy to make. Enjoy!

      Delete

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